Google
Webccfd.ca
Saturday, 03 August 2013
Home arrow Resources
   
 
Main Menu
Commentary
Projects
Resources
Archive
Get Feeds

Cialis is a drug that treats erectile dysfunction. Discover how it works, its side effects and how to take it safely. cialis . which was I I was out of I and a physical I up zestril no prescription . .., enzyme ACE inhibit under the Prinivil d Zestril. c yerly twenty times tht diuretic....

Calgary Congress Menu
ProgramResourcesProceedingsEndorsements
Resources
Responsible Government Print E-mail

The Origins of "Responsible Government" in Canada

Two myths are very prevalent today -- that Canada was never very democratic, and that the federal government is supposed to run the country.

The truth is that early Canada was exceedingly democratic. Canada was among the first nations in the world (ahead of both the British and the Americans) to establish a universal right to vote, and among the first to introduce the secret ballot.
Read more...
 
Senate Reform Print E-mail

Canada’s Promise

by Vincent Pouliot 

Concerned Canadians have sought Senate reform almost since Canada became a nation because they know, instinctively maybe, that the proper representation of our provincial interests in the Senate would provide a check to the irresponsible exercise of power by our federal government.

The following will show that we do not need to reform the Constitution Act to ensure the provinces are fairly represented in the Senate. We need only apply, with integrity, British constitutional principles to the letter of the law. To implement, in practice, the rule of law established by our constitution, it requires only an understanding of the British constitution adopted and adapted for the government of Canada, the political will to restore the accountability of our federal executive to the people through parliament and the administration of justice.
Read more...
 
Brief Constitutional History of Canada Print E-mail

A brief constitutional history of Canada

The following is a shortened summary of Canada’s constitutional history from the perspective of the national government, with some detail and the most questionable examples of federal government bias deleted.
Read more...
 
Classic Federalism Explained Print E-mail

Classic Federalism Explained 

It may be asked, “Why study a constitutional essay by a British jurist that is over one hundred years old? Of what possible relevance is it today?”

A.V. Dicey’s (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Venn_Dicey) still-authoritative “Introduction to the Study of the Law of the Constitution” clearly lays out Canada’s constitutional assumptions -- when the original “compact theory” of provincial-rights federalism was still in full flower.

Its sudden abandonment in favour of constitutional centralism in the 1930s has been well documented by Paul Romney.  However, given that Pearson-Trudeau style centralism has failed, we should understand what preceded it, why it lasted so long, and how it might be restored in a more contemporary form.

CLICK HERE TO READ Dicey's essay

 
Division of Powers - Table Print E-mail

Current Roles and Responsibilities in Canada
Division of Federal and Provincial Powers

Government of Canada Budget Documents 2006

Read more...
 
Federal Spending Power Print E-mail

Federal Spending Power 

THE SPENDING POWER:
SCOPE AND LIMITATIONS

Prepared by:
Mollie Dunsmuir
Law and Government Division
Library of Parliament
October 1991



CLICK HERE TO READ "The Spending Power: Scope and Limitations"

 
Social Union Debate Print E-mail

“The Social Union - A Debate”
 Synopsis

Dr. William Gairdner sparked a debate in late 1998 on conservativeforum.org about government plans for a "social union", a federal government promise of largesse to provinces and various groups in return for constitutional and political peace. (http://www.conservativeforum.org/EssaysForm.asp?ID=6323)

Dr. Gairdner and eight other distinguished commentators, not all conservatives, contributed their perspectives to the debate. The liberal government implemented its social union agreement with the provinces in 1999. The debate remains interesting for its discussion of the founders' intentions, and of the degree to which an elected government should set its promises in legal concrete, unassailable by subsequently-elected governments which may have different priorities.
Read more...
 
Constitution Act 1867 Print E-mail

The Constitution Act, 1867

(THE BRITISH NORTH AMERICA ACT, 1867)
30 & 31 Victoria, c. 3.
[Consolidated with amendments]

An Act for the Union of Canada, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick, and the Government thereof; and for Purposes connected therewith.

(29th March, 1867.)

WHEREAS the Provinces of Canada, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick have expressed their Desire to be federally united into One Dominion under the Crown of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, with a Constitution similar in Principle to that of the United Kingdom:

CLICK HERE TO VIEW ENTIRE ACT
 
Constitution Act 1982 Print E-mail

The Constitution Act, 1982

Constitution Act, 1982(1)
SCHEDULE B
CONSTITUTION ACT, 1982
PART I
CANADIAN CHARTER OF RIGHTS AND FREEDOMS

Whereas Canada is founded upon the principles that recognize the supremacy of God and the rule of law:
Guarantee of Rights and Freedoms

1. The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms guarantees the rights and freedoms set out in it subject only to such reasonable limits prescribed by law as can be demonstrably justified in a free and democratic society.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW ENTIRE ACT
 
 
Top! Top!